The military remembrance poppy

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Backroads Features a nice article on Texas poppies this month:

Poppies are sprouting up again as Texans observe the centennial of “The War to End All Wars,” as it was called back then. According to the Georgetown Texas Red Poppy Festival held annually in late April, seeds from wild poppies in Europe were sent to Georgetown right after World War I.

Read the whole article on the Temple Daily Telegram site.


In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

By Lx 121Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link


From Wikipedia: The remembrance poppy is an artificial flower that has been used since 1921 to commemorate military personnel who have died in war, and represents a common or field poppy, Papaver rhoeas. Inspired by the World War I poem “In Flanders Fields“, and promoted by Moina Michael, they were first adopted by the American Legion to commemorate American soldiers killed in that war (1914–1918). They were then adopted by military veterans‘ groups in parts of the British Empire.